How to Add Pandas into Your Daily Mix of Writing: 5 Easy Steps

Writing new work for me is a time of creativity and exploration. I certainly have many more starts of stories than I have finished pieces but I never feel as though I have wasted my time writing those unfinished starts. Why? Well, because I tend to view any writing as time at practice of my craft.

So, here’s my promise to you today. The answer to that gnawing question: how do I include Panda bears in my daily writing? I think we might all agree that a certain amount of stick-to-it-iveness will be employed. But, really, the reason for this post is because of the video at the end. I saw it on Facebook and simply had to include it in today’s how-to-write article.

Normally, when I begin writing a story, I think in terms of the beginning, middle and end.

  1. 14PandaBabiesAnd, typically, I start writing at the… wait for it… the beginning. Voila! I start by doing some free writing in order to uncoil images planted in my subconscious brain. As I travel through this beginning journey, I usually come to a stopping point and must consider why readers might care about the characters in this beginning. What is the character’s problem and how will she solve that problem. In this beginning time, I write until I stall out on how the story is unfolding. When questions begin to outweigh the story coming forth, I stop and move to the next step…
  2. EndangeredPandaI jump to the end and ask myself: is this going to be a happy story or a tragedy? I know. Right? I didn’t go to the middle first. It’s okay. Don’t call the writing police. If this process doesn’t work for you, no worries. Proceed with what works best for you at finishing your novel. During this second step, I ask several more questions. They are: what is the ultimate action outcome (i.e. does someone die, does someone have a child, does someone get married?). Other important questions include: what will the character learn at the end of the story? What will immediate other characters learn? What will the community learn? But most imperatively, I ask: what will the reader learn?
  3. panda-hanging-from-treeAfter considering the end, then I consider the story’s climax action–the big blow-out, the major point at which we see the protagonist pitted against the antagonist. This occurs at the very end of the middle part of the plot–as close to the end of the story as possible. Because to have a bunch of stuff happening after the climax is just… anticlimactic.
  4. After the first draft is a time when you can weave in elements you deem important to your story such as theme (pandas), metaphor (pandas) and mood (pandas).
  5. Mood can move throughout the story, for instance, we might first see playful baby pandas. Then, later on, we might see (skip to the 3rd image) a panda thriving in the wild. And by the end of the story we can see redemptive images of humans feeling bad about the blight we have placed on pandas. By the end, you have successfully woven in several elements all pointing to the end. What has the human character learned? What has the panda learned? And, most importantly, what has the reader learned?

So, that’s how you add pandas into your daily writing. Maybe I have fulfilled my promise? And… maybe not. But I had fun!

Now, here’s a little extra panda wonderfulness that you should view. Enjoy!

And, you can buy my latest book #1 Amazon bestseller THE DEER EFFECT by Clicking Here!

Freebies Give Me the Jeebies

Not really. I love freebies. Freebies make me smile. That’s why I’m giving away two items:

  • A paperback copy of THE DEER EFFECT, and
  • A one-hour writing consultation on how to bolster your novel’s first chapter.

You can read more about these two offers on my latest newsletter. Just click the link below.

http://shoutout.wix.com/so/64906069-1d6c-40e7-9a81-e1784e8c97cc#/main

I write books!

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Freebies Give Me the Jeebies

Not really. I love freebies. Freebies make me smile. That’s why I’m giving away two items:

  • A paperback copy of THE DEER EFFECT, and
  • A one-hour writing consultation on how to bolster your novel’s first chapter.

You can read more about these two offers on my latest newsletter. Just click the link below.

http://shoutout.wix.com/so/64906069-1d6c-40e7-9a81-e1784e8c97cc#/main

I write books!

012015-TDE-3D-Image-NewYears

Here We Go, 2015. It Had Better Be Good… Or Else!

Here We Go, 2015. It Had Better Be Good… Or Else!

Mother used to end all of her threats with, “Or else!” That’s how my sister and I grew up. “Clean your room!” Wait for it… then boom! “Or else!” Understand a little better now?

The problem was we never heard what might happen if or elseever came. Would we melt into a puddle of glue like the Bad Witch? Would we be made to dig 6-foot deep holes in the backyard? Would we have to stand for an…

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Here We Go, 2015. It Had Better Be Good… Or Else!

Mother used to end all of her threats with, “Or else!” That’s how my sister and I grew up. “Clean your room!” Wait for it… then boom! “Or else!” Understand a little better now?

The problem was we never heard what might happen if or else ever came to fruition. Would we melt into a puddle of glue like the Bad Witch? Would we be made to dig 6-foot deep holes in the backyard? Would we have to stand for an unendurable 15 minutes in a corner with pepper on our tongues? Okay. That one really happened but you get the gist.

Seriously, though, our mom never ended the phrase, “Or else, I’ll have your father hold your tongue on the end of a battery for three days or until you light up the sky!” She couldn’t really say this anyway because my dad was not what I would call a disciplinarian.

However, none of these concerns matter today. I was just waxing nostalgic. Maybe because another year has come and gone with another on its heels and so much hope bubbling through the internet, through the television set, on people’s faces, in their voices–that I just had to put up a poll. Because isn’t that what people do when they see a vision of hope… they put up a poll? Some even tie a little flag on it? Or, wait. Am I thinking pole. No matter. I’m not rewriting this post because of one little slip of the word.

So, answer these questions… OR ELSE!

I write books.

Me on Twitter: twitter.com/susanwingate

Me on Facebook: facebook.com/authorsusanwingate

My books on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1tDjYgu

A Christmas Message

“And a star appeared and guided the Magi across the desert to Bethlehem, to a manger where He lay sleeping.”

The little girl’s eyes were wide as she listened to her mother tell the tale of how the three wise men found Jesus.

“How, Momma?”

“The star led them.”

“Isn’t the desert big?”

“Very big.”

“I would get lost.”

The mother guided softly a hair across her daughter’s forehead. She pulled up the…

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A Christmas Message

“And a star appeared and guided the Magi across the desert to Bethlehem, to a manger where He lay sleeping.”

The little girl’s eyes were wide as she listened to her mother tell the tale of how the three wise men found Jesus.

“How, Momma?”

“The star led them.”

“Is the desert big?”

“Very.”

“I would get lost.”

The mother guided softly a hair across her daughter’s forehead. She pulled up the covers to the girl’s neck and leaned over to give her a kiss–first on one cheek, then the other. Then she spoke, “You never get lost when Jesus guides you.”

At that, the little girl closed her eyes. Her mother switched off the bed lamp and whispered, “I love you.”

Merry Christmas. You won’t be hearing from me until 2015. God bless you all!

What readers of THE DEER EFFECT can do for me this Christmas season? If you haven’t yet, please post a review! THE DEER EFFECT is now available in paperback. Just click the image below and get zoomed over to Amazon.

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Writing “The End” on Your Novel

I was once told by a self-proclaimed writing guru that writing the end of a book shouldn’t be an event. That we shouldn’t get all wrapped up in the fact that we finished a book–your first or your fiftieth, that we should simply move on to the next story and plow through that one too.

And I get that. You don’t have to tell me to keep my nose down and my fingers flying. I write daily.

But, here’s…

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Writing “The End” on Your Novel

I was once told by a self-proclaimed writing guru that writing the end of a book shouldn’t be an event. That we shouldn’t get all wrapped up in the fact that we finished a book–your first or your fiftieth, that we should simply move on to the next story and plow through that one too.

And I get that. You don’t have to tell me to keep my nose down and my fingers flying. I write daily.

But, here’s the thing: I would understand this setting aside of emotional attachment to my writing more if I were a robot having zero feelings and no degree of the understanding of one’s own self-worth. But, I’m not a robot. I’m a human being with all the longings anyone else has.

So, as a human being who also writes for a living, the satisfaction I feel from finishing another story is tantamount to, say, crossing the finish line for the career marathoner.

Completing a first novel exemplifies my point even greater but the satisfaction is still worthy of a celebratory glass of champagne for even a tenth, a twentieth or a one-hundredth novel.

I write for myself, of course but sometimes I write for other writers. In fact, I am currently under contract with a NY Times Bestseller. We’re working on a 3-book thriller series. I’m finding that finishing those books gives me equal satisfaction as finishing my own.

Maybe all that the finishing of a novel is, is that simple joy one gets from completing any project that has a beginning, a middle, and a ending. I’m sure the building contractor feels similarly about putting the final touches on a house. It’s a big thing building something from the ground up. Even a novel.

And, yet, although the guru makes a good point–one where we are just another writer in the flotsam who needs a substantial inventory to make a living and, so, we are to press, press, press through to that next unwritten story–I fear he’s missing a major point. Because a big part of this writing thing we do, as with any job we choose, should allow feeling joyful after our work is done.

I write books. ~Susan.

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Entering Book Awards and All That Jazz!

TDE-GreatReviewsI’m thrilled to announce that The Deer Effect is receiving some amazing reviews. Currently, the book’s average star-rating on Amazon is 4.8. That’s awesome.

Readers have been enjoying the characters and emotional quality this story lends. They are also commenting about the scene setting. A few have even said that The Deer Effect is a book that should be read more than once. Isn’t that kind?

With…

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